E-recycling FAQs

What is the environmental impact of disposing electronics into the environment without any precaution?

Electronics are complex devices which are made of a wide variety of material constituents. Some of the constituents, such as lead, nickel, cadmium, and mercury, could pose risks to human health or the environment if mismanaged at their end-of-life. The EPA strongly supports keeping used electronics out of landfills, to recover materials and reduce the environmental impacts and energy demands from mining and manufacturing. Electronics are made from valuable resources, such as precious metals, copper, and engineered plastics, all of which require considerable energy to process and manufacture. Recycling electronics recovers valuable materials and as a result, we reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce pollution, save energy, and save resources by extracting fewer raw materials from the earth.

For example: Recycling one million laptops saves the energy equivalent to the electricity used by 3,657 US homes in a year. One metric ton of circuit boards can contain 40 to 800 times the amount of gold and 30 to 40 times the amount of copper mined from one metric ton of ore in the US.

How do I choose between sending my used computer equipment for reuse or recycling?

Define clear objectives of what you want to be done with the equipment and the ultimate disposition of the equipment and/or component parts. Consider the following:

  • Reuse and Donation
  • Do you want to provide a community service by donating equipment?
  • Do you want a tax deduction for your contribution (ensure that the organization is a non-profit corporation as defined by the Internal Revenue Service (501(c) tax exempt status)?
  • What are your data security needs?
  • De-manufacture/Recycle
  • What are your data security needs?
  • Do you want your equipment resold?
  • Do you want the equipment disassembled into raw materials (i.e. metals, plastics, glass) to be marketed as recyclables?
  • Do you want the equipment destroyed?

Good Tips

Tip #1 Utilize all your resources.

When you’re looking to hire the right employees, it’s important to cast a wide net, but equally important to pre-screen candidates so there are no surprises down the road. Goodwill Southern California has a very large and diversified pool of qualified people from which to choose, and all have been carefully screened. Our goal is to exceed your expectations so that you’ll continue to use us for your recruitment needs. This enables us to better serve our mission of finding sustainable employment for individuals with disabilities and vocational disadvantages.

Tip #2 Assets come in all shapes, sizes and abilities.

People with disabilities are a dependable and valuable workforce who have higher rates of employee retention, which reduces hiring and training costs. Employers can leverage tax benefits from hiring people with disabilities and attract a broader customer base for their goods and services. At the same time, employers can demonstrate their commitment to corporate social responsibility by hiring people with disabilities or vocational disadvantages, which include at risk youth, mature workers and military veterans.

Tip #3 Save time, trees and lawyer’s fees by securely shredding sensitive information.

Using a certified vendor for your shredding needs costs considerably less than shredding your own documents when you factor in the cost of shredders, labor costs, office space, and disposal costs. As for environmental savings, every ton of paper shredded saves 17 trees. And then there are those lawyer’s fees. Several federal laws require organizations to protect nonpublic personal information including The Federal Privacy Act, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), and the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (also known as the Financial Service Modernization Act). Businesses that don’t comply with these regulations risk incurring significant fines, and even possible prison sentences.

FAQs

Document Imaging FAQs

What is document imaging?

Document imaging is the process of capturing hardcopy documents by scanning to an image and storing digitally on a computer system. Standard paper, faxes, photographs, or handwritten notes are all good candidates for imaging. Once scanned, the digital images are indexed and stored on CD-ROM’s or on the web where they can be quickly and securely retrieved in a few keystrokes.

What types of documents can you image?

Any document that is frequently referenced should be scanned. Typically, businesses want to image documents such as medical records, financial records, engineering plans, proposals, contracts, or other business related file.

How are the documents indexed, once digitized?

The indexing method is tailored specifically to our client’s needs after a general consultation. Several different methods can be utilized such as keying in each index field, instituting double verify for accuracy, bar-coding, or populating indexes from existing databases.

After documents are imaged, how will they be accessed?

GSC’s imaging system provides CD-ROM access, web access, or a combination of the two. A running index for all scanned documents provides quick retrieval and complete accuracy.

How much technical knowledge is needed at a client site?

The software to navigate through imaged documents has an easy learning curve. The only requirement is for the user to have a basic understanding how to navigate through a Windows-based application.

What if my information is confidential?

GSC understands the importance of confidentiality and is committed to providing our customers with the highest levels of privacy and security. In addition, we strictly adhere to government regulations such as HIPPA and Graham-Leach-Bliley. All our employees are bonded and insured.

Shredding FAQs

Why should my company shred documents?

To ensure the safety and security of your business. Businesses of all types are now realizing the necessity of destroying documentation and media that may contain confidential information about itself or its clientele. Without shredding, this information can be used to steal a person’s identity or ruin business credibility.

How do you charge for your services?

Shredding is charged either by weight or by item. Eg. Archive box, pallet, cabinet, or bag.

How much does a box usually weigh?

Industry Standard: A 1 cubic foot carton (13”x15”) = approx 30lbs.  A 2 cubic foot carton (13”x25”) = approx 50lbs

Do I need to sort or remove metal fasteners?

No, our shredders are built to easily accommodate staples, binder clips, rubber bands, and other fasteners.

How do you ensure the security of our documents?

GSC goes to great lengths to provide the highest level of security available. We adhere to strict industry standards. In addition, our employees are bonded and insured.

What happens to the materials, once shredded?

They are baled and delivered to a paper mill for recycling.

Why use a shredding service instead of using our own shredder?

Simply put, it will save you money. It costs considerably more to shred your own documents, when you factor in the cost of shredders, labor costs, office space, and disposal costs.

Do you charge a fee for onsite containers?

No, containers (consoles) are included free of charge.

E-recycling FAQs

What is the environmental impact of disposing electronics into the environment without any precaution?

Electronics are complex devices which are made of a wide variety of material constituents. Some of the constituents, such as lead, nickel, cadmium, and mercury, could pose risks to human health or the environment if mismanaged at their end-of-life. The EPA strongly supports keeping used electronics out of landfills, to recover materials and reduce the environmental impacts and energy demands from mining and manufacturing. Electronics are made from valuable resources, such as precious metals, copper, and engineered plastics, all of which require considerable energy to process and manufacture. Recycling electronics recovers valuable materials and as a result, we reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce pollution, save energy, and save resources by extracting fewer raw materials from the earth.

For example: Recycling one million laptops saves the energy equivalent to the electricity used by 3,657 US homes in a year. One metric ton of circuit boards can contain 40 to 800 times the amount of gold and 30 to 40 times the amount of copper mined from one metric ton of ore in the US.

How do I choose between sending my used computer equipment for reuse or recycling?

Define clear objectives of what you want to be done with the equipment and the ultimate disposition of the equipment and/or component parts. Consider the following:

  • Reuse and Donation
  • Do you want to provide a community service by donating equipment?
  • Do you want a tax deduction for your contribution (ensure that the organization is a non-profit corporation as defined by the Internal Revenue Service (501(c) tax exempt status)?
  • What are your data security needs?
  • De-manufacture/Recycle
  • What are your data security needs?
  • Do you want your equipment resold?
  • Do you want the equipment disassembled into raw materials (i.e. metals, plastics, glass) to be marketed as recyclables?
  • Do you want the equipment destroyed?